Medellin can rightfully boast of having not the only metro system in the country but one of the world's best public transportation - and the most dramatic. Its metro system north-south, center-to-west stops at the key tourist sites. Where the metro can't go, the MetroCable comes in, three lines linking steep mountain neighborhoods to the valley. Rapid transit bus service, called MetroPlus, connects to the Metro and MetroCable but requires a separate ticket. The city also has an extensive network of privately owned public buses - strange as that may sound - with routes marked on posters in front of the buses.

International and local agency rent cars, but also check out scooter and motorcycle rentals by the day or by the week.

Strangely, this mile-high (1600 m) hilly city in a deep Andean valley is one of the most cycling friendly in South America. While getting around on a bike may not be the best transportation, the city does have a bike-sharing system (EnCiacia) and over 186 miles (300 km) of bike paths with more to come.

Begun back in 1995, the innovative Metro system meshes metro, metro cable and metro buses (with designated stops). It serves the whole metropolitan area and covers about 40 miles (64 km). Service runs from about 4:30 am to 11 pm Monday through Saturday and 5 am to 10 pm Sundays and holidays. Smart cards are available. The Metro's website has an English version.

In addition to the green MetroBuses integrated with Metro stops, other cheaper and more colorful private buses circulate around town. They are hailed like taxis and have the fare and prominent destinations posted on the windshield. Push the red button near the doors when you want to get off.

Choose a radio-dispatched taxi to pick you up when you're out and about. The dispatcher will give you a code to make sure the taxi that arrives is legit. You can hail cabs on the street, but safety may be a concern. Uber also operates in the city.

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