Explore New Territories

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Spend a day exploring Sha Tin, a New Town in the New Territories only 25 minutes by MTA from Tsim Sha Tsui East. Or book into the 1.138-room Regal Riverside on the bank of the Shing Mun River to give yourself plenty of time to see all the attractions. Che Kung and Sha Tin are the closest stations.

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The Hong Kong Heritage Museum alone is worth the train ride. You could easily spend the better part of a day here. The New Territories Heritage Hall introduces 6,000 years of history through dioramas of village life and a computer game allowing you to design your own New Town. Top-quality Chinese art fills nine rooms on the second floor. And don't miss the ornate costumes in the Cantonese Opera Hall. Movie buffs will enjoy the Bruce Lee exhibit, running until 2018. When you're ready for lunch, stroll up the path along the river to New Town Plaza Mall.

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If you have time and interest in seeing local culture outside the museum, cross the river before heading to the mall to visit the Che Kung Temple and Tsang Tai Uk Village. Spin the wheel of fortune in the temple three times for good luck if you're going to the Sha Tin Racecourse later. The 19th century fortified Hakka village is poorly developed as a tourist attraction, which makes it all the more fascinating.

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The New Town Plaza, three shopping malls rolled into one, was the largest mall in the New Territories when it opened in 1980; but unless you can't pass a mall without a shopping pause, beeline to one of the 50 eateries or pick up the makings of a picnic in the Japanese or Taiwanese grocery before starting the climb to an impressive Buddhist monastery. With or without kids, stop by Snoopyland, a "Peanuts" amusement park on the third floor. Come back later for a more thorough exploration of the mall if you are staying on.

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Late afternoon, climb up 431 steps through a bamboo forest to the Temple of Ten Thousand Buddhas. More than 500 gilded Buddhas line the path. Inside the temple are almost 13,000 miniature Buddhas, donated by worshippers since the temple was built in the 1950s. The embalmed and gilded body of its founder is on display in a glass case. The route to the temple from the Sha Tin station, Exit B, is poorly marked. Ask locals for "Man Fat Sze" or at the end of the ramp at Home Square Mall, find Pui Tau Street and follow signs to the Sha Tin Government Building. Then look for a signboard pointing to the monastery. It closes at 5:30 pm, so plan accordingly.

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Have dinner in Chan Kun Kee, a popular dai pai dong in Wo Che Estate Market. If it's a Wednesday (except in August), try your luck at the Sha Tin Racecourse. Races are also held during the day on Saturdays and Sundays.